Cold Dandelion Tea Recipe

Dandelion tea steeping in the shade.

Dandelion tea steeping in the shade.

The beauty of this recipe is most people can find the ingredients in their yard, in a local meadow or woodland.  Nearly everyone knows how to identify dandelions.  But if you decide to use field or wood sorrel (shamrock) instead of lemon juice, be sure you are using real sorrel, not clover, which is often mistaken for sorrel.  Sorrel always has a pleasant, tart, lemony flavor.  Mature clover is bitter.

Ingredients:

20 dandelion blossoms
2 tbspn sugar
1 handful of wood or field sorrel (shamrock) for zest (or 2 tbspn of lemon juice)
1 liter hot water


Remove bracts and buds (the green parts), leaving only the golden rays of the dandelion blossoms. It’s easiest to just pinch the base of the bud and pull out the rays.

Place rays in liter canning jar.

Add sugar to taste.

If adding sorrel, do so now.  A handful is plenty.  If adding lemon juice, add after steeping.

Add one cup of boiling water. Steep til room temperature, then refrigerate.

The dandelion rays will slowly sink to the bottom and clump. Strain by carefully pouring off the tea. You may use a cheese cloth or tea strainer to assist.  Top with cold water to make one liter.

Serve when chill.

Field sorrel.  Note the yellow blossoms.  Wood sorrel has pale violet or pale purple blossoms.

Field sorrel. Note the yellow blossoms. Wood sorrel has pale violet or pale purple blossoms.

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