How Small Forests Can Help Small Woodland Owners & Save the Planet

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Click to see the New York Times article.

While Nova Scotia Premier McNeil and his sycophant, Dept. of Env. minister Miller, pretend that private forests mean nothing in terms of global environmental health, remove regulation and would like to urge private landowners to cut down their forest for a quick buck, more progressive thinkers have realized that private forests are of huge necessity to the ecosystem. In the USA alone, private forests constitute over 50% of the nation’s total forests. Instead of just regulating such forests, ways are being created to allow private owners of woodlands to profit from their forests without destroying them.

I’ve often advocated for forest farming and the development of highly selective logging in concert with a complete industry, i.e., instead of Canada cutting and selling its forests abroad as fast as possible for the lowest tier of wholesale profit, instead, cut a tree, reduce it top grade wood, recycle the pulp, manufacture every part into an intermediate product (such as a musical instrument or furniture), finish the furniture all with local products and labor, then market the furniture through wholesale and final retail tiers, thus creating layers of homegrown industry and jobs that provide direct income, as opposed to operating on Northern Pulp’s and ForestryNS’ hazy “trickle down effect”–their notion their 339 FT jobs create a vast trickle down of income into the local community.

Of the many progressive ideas being proposed is one mentioned in this article: measuring carbon capture of private forests, and allowing forest owners to sell those carbon units to industry. This provides direct income of as much as $45 CAN dollars per acre per year to family owners of forests, regular income as opposed to the $3.50 per acre per year one would get for logging a forest.

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