Late Season Harvesting

parsnips 2015 small

Huge parsnips as big around as my forearm at the base were the showy prizes of this cold harvest.

It was time to do some late season gardening. We harvested three crates of parsnips like these from a single forty foot long row.

We also started bringing in our Jerusalem artichokes. This particular, unusual plant does not get harvested til nearly winter when the plant has fully died back and the soil is cold.

Nothing . . . absolutely nothing . . . gives you as much nutritious, delicious food per square foot as the Jerusalem artichoke. These five crates, about 150 lbs, were harvested from a single 50 foot row. The taste is much like an artichoke heart. Yield per square foot is about twice that of the vaunted potato and they require no maintenance whatsoever. Not so much as a single weeding.

jerusalem artichoke harvest 2015 small

Requiring almost no care except tilling and compost in spring, nothing I know of produces more food for less effort than the Jerusalem artichoke. As this is a wild plant, it can easily be transferred to feral meadows. If the soil is friable, it will provide a long-term, reliable emergency food source.

We have a lot more planted, and back in our woods, we have wild patches sown as an emergency food source.

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Categories: Uncategorized | 2 Comments

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2 thoughts on “Late Season Harvesting

  1. Kim Lipscomb

    Jerusalem Artichokes? Lovely yellow flowers? Major food during the dirty 30s? Recipes? How to clean? Love to see your emails in the inbox. Kim

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