Eating With the Seasons of the Sacred Earth

Rhubarb launches eagerly skyward in its raised bed.  Next year I'll have to quarter this crown, meaning I'll get for new plants out of it.

Rhubarb launches eagerly skyward in its raised bed. Next year I’ll have to quarter this crown, meaning I’ll get for new plants out of it.

We are coming to the end of asparagus season. It’s about time to let the root stocks be so they can gain strength over the summer for next year’s growing season. Thank you, my faithful asparagus crowns. You’re always one of the first fresh green things we have in spring, barring some of the earliest wild forage. I gathered an armload of rhubarb today, too, and figure I might pare them down one last time before leaving them for the rest of the summer. Next year I have to divide those crowns, which means I need to make space for four times as many rhubarb. But the ox-eye daisies are growing huge leaves just along the edge of the gardens and I brought in an armload of them, too. They make a wonderful tarragon substitute in our climate that is too cold for real tarragon to grow, and with their sweetish crispness, are nice in salads, too. Today, we had them with dandelion leaves and wild onion tops on tacos. And along the edge of the gardens there is thick, juicy foot-high wild lamb’s quarter, and that’s all getting harvested tomorrow. That will be our new wild green til the gardens are throwing kohlrabi and kale at us next month.

Today, Arielle and I planted 150 new strawberry crowns in a matted row system, and that should provide ample strawberries for the next three years. Two years from now we shall plant another matted row strawberry garden and rotate between them so that when one is slowing down, the other has fresh plants. I decided to abandon the plasticulture upon learning that the ideal strategy is to replant that method annually. What a terrible huge waste of something as polluting and non-biodegradable as plastic.

Advertisements
Categories: Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Post navigation

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: