Gardens Hale

A hand span tall today, two feet long day after tomorrow. How on Earth does asparagus manage to grow so fast when nobody's looking?

A hand span tall today, two feet long day after tomorrow. How on Earth does asparagus manage to grow so fast when nobody’s looking?

The year’s gardens are just beginning to come to life. The haskap berries are halfway to ripeness and the shrubs are rapidly growing huge. The onions are well into sprouting with pungent tops. The first potatoes are just peeking over the deep rows, showing only the barest green leaf buds, but they are early yielding Irish potatoes and will provide creamy new potatoes in just a handful of weeks. The young leeks are almost 6″ tall now and radishes are vigorously catching the abundant sun and making use of the rains that fall every few days. In the meadows, wild strawberries sport huge blossoms, and I am expecting a bumper crop this year. Gooseberry shrubs are thick and tall now, as are the currants, and the elderberry shrubs have sprung to life, though it is a while yet til they blossom. Everywhere, wild plantain begs us to boil it into stews, and dock and burdock throw up exuberant petioles, offering more harvest than we can eat. Even dandelions still volunteer for the frying pan. And every other day we get a rich harvest of asparagus. Asparagus never ceases to amaze me: that something I planted five years ago will so vigorously contribute food to us all this time later is just remarkable. I have faith in the magic of the land and the bounty of the Green Man. This will be a year of marvelous harvest in the Hollow.

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Categories: Uncategorized | 2 Comments

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2 thoughts on “Gardens Hale

  1. yes a good year, bountiful. I have only eaten plantain in salads, i look forward to putting it in soups now. I love hearing how your family is using wild foods.

  2. You’re welcome. Plantain is not only a lovely and versatile vegetable, but it is a good medicinal, too. Mash it fresh into a poultice with a little lard and yarrow (common around here) and old man’s beard (a lichen) and you have a powerful antibiotic blend that will also instantly stop bleeding and promote healing.

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