New Gardens’ Bounty

Here in Nova Scotia, halfway between the equator and the North Pole, and at our altitude, spring has only just begun a couple weeks ago, but already the gardens and forests are providing.
An asparagus crown--one of many in two gardens--sends up eager shoots. We've already had our first harvest.

An asparagus crown–one of many in two gardens–sends up eager shoots. We’ve already had our first harvest.

At left, we see it’s time to start selective harvesting of asparagus from both the old and new  beds, which are now both mature and can sustain harvesting all the way to late summer.

Rhubarb and garlic in a raised garden that will be ready for first harvest in a week or two.

Rhubarb and garlic in a raised garden that will be ready for first harvest in a week or two.

At right middle, we see domestic rhubarb and accompanying spring garlic, both halfway to harvest, in one of the raised gardens.

Wild onions are below right, well emerged in a large patch about 20 feet long and a couple yards wide. We’ve been sustainably harvesting from this patch for years. It is ready to start contributing to our meals now, and will fill in for onions till our domestic onions are ready for harvest in the nearby Old Garden.

Wild onions are vigorous and one of the first things to emerge.  Patches stick around for years and are prolific if not over harvested.

Wild onions are vigorous and one of the first things to emerge. Patches stick around for years and are prolific if not over harvested.

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2 thoughts on “New Gardens’ Bounty

  1. Greetings from the Wisconsin River Valley. A very busy time at our place. Bill, my husband and myself will be planting 1ooo asparagus roots. We have 5 acres of organic asparagus. We bought this several years ago. Everyone loves our asparagus. This land and the sandy soil is a wonderful growing medium for this wonderful food.
    We also plan on expanding our rhubarb patch.
    Wild onions or Ramps are starting. The magical morel mushrooms are appearing in the woods. We have A festival honoring the morel at a town called Muscoda, along the Wisconsin River.
    Many Blessings

  2. I have heard of their morel festival. I wish we had morels here in such abundance, but in Nova Scotia they are rare, as are ramps. I can find them, but never lots. Our soil leans toward loamy and clay and holds moisture, so to grow asparagus, we have to raise the gardens, but in well tended, well drained gardens, asparagus does well. Enjoy your farm! Sounds lovely.

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